The Environmental Benefits of Roof Gardens

Posted by on May 29, 2018 in Landscape |

The Environmental Benefits of Roof Gardens

Imagine peering down from the window of an airplane that’s flying over a major city and seeing a veritable forest of green below. Sound like the Utopian vision of a science fiction novel? This scenario is actually becoming a reality, albeit gradually, as more and more urban buildings are using their only available space – their rooftops – to cultivate gardens that can work wonders on the surrounding environment.

America has been a little slow in comprehending and capitalizing on green roof technologies, and its markets remain immature in comparison to many countries across the Atlantic. Roof gardens, which feature layers of soil deliberately placed over roofs to support vegetation, were first developed in Germany in the 1960’s. From there they spread to other European countries. It’s estimated that 10 percent of German rooftops have become “greened”. In America, the practice is becoming more common in cities like Chicago, Atlanta, and Portland, where legislation encourages it.

Chicago’s City Hall roof garden, one of the most prominent and well-known in the U.S., is significantly cooler during hot summer months than the surrounding area. The “heat island effect” occurs in cities when traditional building materials reflect the sun’s radiation back as heat, making these urban environments at least 7 degrees hotter than other areas where the overall temperature would otherwise be the same. Gardens offset this problem by absorbing the heat into their soil and organic matter.

Rooftop gardens offer a slew of other advantages as well. They can produce food, as well as plants that are useful for other purposes (like botanical medicine). They store water, which can reduce flooding (and wastewater contamination) from stormwater runoff. Buildings with roof gardens benefit from increased thermal as well as noise insulation. There is simply no other way to bring nature’s bounty into tightly-enclosed city environments than by taking advantage of unused roof space.

The gardens grown on these otherwise vacant spaces work to combat pollution, as well. Rooftop plants filter Carbon Dioxide and other pollutants out of the air. Their roots drink up the rainwater, removing pollutants and heavy metals out of it in the process. Rooftop gardens also encourage “green” practices in their tenants, like organic waste recycling through composting. All in all, they are increasingly becoming a focus for reducing the negative environmental impact of cities.

Last but not least, they can serve as feeding stations. A variation known as “brown roofs” – which consist of a thin layer of crushed ribble and gravel – are intended to be colonized by spiders and insects, which then provide food for birds.

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Knock, Knock, Who’s There? It’s the Bug Guy

Posted by on May 1, 2018 in Pest Control |

Knock, Knock, Who’s There? It’s the Bug Guy

September 11, 2001. Everyone who was old enough to understand what was going on that day remembers where they were and what they were doing. Like many other people, the economic effects of that day were far more lasting for me personally than I had imagined they could be.

3 months later I was laid-off from my contract I.T. job in Austin, TX. With short notice, I had to find a job in a tough economy. I scoured Monster.com and other job search; I applied at local grocery stores, Wal-Mart, Home Depot, and other retail stores. No one was hiring.

February rolled around and my best friend recommended I apply with the pest control company he was working for. I had done some contract I.T. work for them before since a common friend of ours owned the business. After some thought, I called the owner and told him my situation. He hired me over the phone.

When the summer season hit, I went out to the company’s Mesa, AZ branch. I attained a full license in Arizona, and worked as the primary technician for new sales. This is when the job got interesting. The majority of customers were NOT sold on the service when I showed up for the first time. I had to use the customer service skills I had learned working on I.T. Help Desks to re-sell the account and assure them of the need for treatment.

Dealing with people was by far the best part of the job. All kinds of people live in this world, and all of them have pest problems at some point; from the modest homes in a subdivision, to the multi-million dollar homes on Camelback Mountain in Scottsdale.

It takes all kinds of people to be exterminators. Many people think of the profession of exterminator as un-respectable. I say to the contrary. They are men and women doing honest work, and supporting their families. It takes quite a bit of intelligence to perform this demanding job. I admire all who undertake it as a profession.

I’ve since moved back into the I.T. field, but still retain my knowledge of pest control, and perform treatment on my own home. Everyone should have a trade they can fall back on in hard times, and clearly this is one that will always be in demand.

This part of my story led me to decide on re-making a blog about home improvement, and I wanna start on sharing what I know about pest control. We all want to give a shelter that is safe and relieved from pests, right? Most especially if we have children in the house, we hate insects and rodents lurking around the house.

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Natural and Organic Ways to Get Rid of Ants

Posted by on Apr 2, 2018 in Pest Control |

Natural and Organic Ways to Get Rid of Ants

First things first: Ants and their tactics. The main thing you need to know about ants is that they leave scent trails, so no method for getting rid of ants is 100% effective. Which is to say – if you’re the kind of person who wants to nuke ’em with toxins, the next ant colony will to show up tomorrow anyway.

But you’re probably not that kind of person, because you’re reading this article. And, fortunately, some of the best ways of getting rid of ants involve getting rid of their scent trails – something that’s easy to do with natural and organic pest control methods.

Second things second: terminology. “Organic” is a misnomer – lots of poisonous chemicals are organic in the sense that they contain carbon, but that’s not what this article is about either. I’m going to list some natural pest control methods that are available in your cabinets or at your grocery store, that are non-toxic to humans, that can be bought with or without “certified organic” status.

Necessary information: The first step to all of these methods is to find where the ants are coming in. It’s often a little crack in the frame of a window, or by the floorboards. Ants are very small!

  1. Vinegar. Use a spray bottle to spray vinegar around the area where the ants are coming in, and anywhere else you’ve seen them walking. Smell that funny smell? So do they, and it confuses them and removes their scent trail.
  2. Black Pepper. Sprinkle around the ant area – again, it blocks their scent. The oil may also be an irritant to them.
  3. Diatomaceous Earth. This is a fancy name for a kind of chalk-like powder which kills insects. The grains are sharp-edged and absorb hydration, causing the ants to dehydrate and die. For a widespread problem with ants in the floor, such that blocking one or two entrances won’t remove them, sprinkle this powder over the entire area and then vacuum later. A dust mask is recommended, as breathing the powder in can be harmful, but it’s otherwise non-toxic.
  4. Cinnamon. This is my favorite way of getting rid of ants, though be careful, as it might stain. Like black pepper, it blocks their scent.
  5. Combined methods. Wipe the area down with vinegar, getting rid of the ants that are present, and follow up by sprinkling black pepper or cinnamon over the place where the ants are getting in.
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DIY Home Pest Control: Save Hundreds of Dollars Every Year

Posted by on Mar 10, 2018 in Pest Control |

DIY Home Pest Control: Save Hundreds of Dollars Every Year

Difficult economic times have forced many homeowners to find ways to save money on things like pest control. Pest control is one homeownership maintenance cost that can be drastically reduced saving you up to $300 or more per year if you do it yourself.

Follow these DIY home pest control tips and advice on products that will save you hundreds of dollars every year while keeping your home bug free!

DIY Home Pest Control: Materials

  • Gloves
  • Fertilizer Spreader for the Yard
  • Ortho Max Pest Control for Lawns
  • Ortho Max Indoor Pest Control Spray

DIY Home Pest Control Step 1:

Home pest control begins with a complete treatment of the areas outside of the home where bugs tend to live. Treating the yard is the first step to preventing pests inside the home. Wear gloves and pour Ortho Max pest control for Lawns into a fertilizer spreader to be spread over the lawn. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to maintain the amount of pest control granules that are spread onto the lawn.

DIY Home Pest Control Step 2:

Once you have applied bug killing granules all over the entire lawn, you are ready to control the bugs that may linger inside the home. Begin by spraying the eves in the attic with Ortho Max Pest Control Spray. From the attic, work your way down to the main floor of the home. Spray a thin stream of pest control along baseboards, under cabinets, behind appliances and along doorways that lead outside of the home.

DIY Home Pest Control Costs:

Typically, Ortho Max lawn granules only cost about $20 for enough treatment to treat a half acre lawn twice per year. It is recommended to treat in early spring and again in the fall. The indoor spray comes in a gallon form and costs under $10. This gallon will last at least an entire year. Treat the entire house one time and then use the spray as needed if you notice any bugs.

DIY Home Pest Control Tips:

  • The indoor spray can be used on a monthly basis on doorways to prevent insects from entering the home. This spray also works great on porches throughout the year. Always treat areas that are susceptible to bugs entering from outside of the home.
  • Remove all pine mulch from beds that are in the yard or close to main entryways into the home. Pine bark style mulch attracts hundreds of different species of bugs. Treat mulch in flower beds and gardens with an insect repellent and insecticide that will prevent the build up of bugs in these areas. Reducing bugs in the yard will reduce the likelihood of such bugs entering the home!
  • Annual treatment of the home and yard will keep pests at bay. An entire year’s worth of pest control with store bought pesticides costs less than $30 saving you at least $300 each year!
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Simple Solutions to Home Pest Control

Posted by on Feb 16, 2018 in Pest Control |

Simple Solutions to Home Pest Control

In this financially challenged eco conscious world better and cheaper solutions to our everyday problems are being realized daily. Much of the focus devoted to the age old problem, how to build the better mouse trap. In other words how do I get rid of household pest.

To my surprise there are some things you might already use in your daily routine, that is quite effective. For instance a good household combination that can be used to kill wasps is a modest amount of dish washing detergent with cold water. Take aim and douse the nest or use a stream type sprayer for air bourn wasp. It has an instant knock down effect.

A cheap yet safe and effective rat poison, can be made from this simple mixture. Mix equal parts of cement with flour and a touch of cocoa for flavor. Place a pan of water next to it. The cement should be the pure form without the rocks and sand.

On the other hand a good cockroach bait can be made from the following ingredients. Mix 4 tablespoons borax, 2 tablespoons of flour and 1 tablespoon of cocoa. Put in small containers, preferably bottle caps and place where the little villains hang out.

And who hasn’t been annoyed by the usual summer invasion by an army of ants. Before you buy that expensive bait try sprinkling cinnamon around the apparent point of entry. Sprinkle a modest amount because I’ve noticed on one occasion when I sprinkled lightly, they navigate
their way through the granules.

A good killing mixture is regular syrup with a modest amount of baking yeast to make an effective ant bait. Smear the compound along ant trails for the best results.

A good mosquito repellent is a plain bounce fabric softener dryer sheet. Carry a couple of sheets partially exposed in your pocket. You may have to periodically rub your arms and clothing with them for added protection.

If from time to time you experience critters getting into your attic. Just toss some moth balls around especially at the point of entry. `A friend of mine had a unique problem. It seems that every dog in the neighborhood used his yard for a poop stop. I suggested the mothballs and so far it has stopped. It doesn’t have to be done indefinitely, just until they get trained to another spot.

I on the other hand had a two legged pest problem. A friend who just kept coming and calling regardless of the measures I took to minimize contact. Not answering the door or phone sometimes telling him the wife wanted me to do errands etc. After giving it a little thought I used a control method that has worked for years. I loan him money and that was the best twenty dollars I ever spent. Haven’t seen him since.

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